Dedicated to dance
since 1910.

Buy Latest Issue

Project Polunin

Posted on October 24, 2017

Project Polunin, the company featuring dancer Sergei Polunin, has announced the programme for its London Coliseum season, which runs from December 5 to 10, 2017.

The evening will have the umbrella title SATORI, a Japanese Buddhist term for awakening or enlightenment. Polunin describes this as his personal journey to reconnect with his love for dance and passion for the arts.

Polunin will dance in First Solo by Andrey Kaydanovskiy, whose 2016 work Tea or Coffee was danced in the last Project Polunin season.

Scriabiniana will be the London premiere of a work by Kasyan Goleizovsky (1892–1970), a significant figure in Russian ballet immediately before and after the Russian revolution. A pupil of Mikhail Fokine and Alexander Gorsky, he was also an early influence on George Balanchine: “Seeing Goleizovsky was what first gave me the courage to try something different on my own,” he remembered. Goleizovsky founded his own Chamber Ballet in 1916 before working for the Bolshoi Theatre until 1927, when his work was dropped after the failure of his revolutionary ballet The Whirlwind. He did not return to the Bolshoi until the 1960s, when he created the ballet suite Scriabiniana, to music by Alexander Scriabin.

This revival marks the 125th anniversary of the choreographer’s birth. The company promise the most complete version of the suite, performed with full orchestra. The choreography will be staged by Ksenia Oyvental, directed by Roman Mikhejenkov, with costumes by Sofia Filatova.

The evening ends with the world premiere of Satori, choreographed by Polunin himself. Directed by Gabriel Marcel del Vecchio, it will be performed to music by film composer Lorenz Dangel. The sets will be by David LaChapelle, who directed the very popular Take Me To Church video starring Polunin, with costumes by Angelina Atlagic. Casts for Satori and Scriabiniana are still to be announced.

Project Polunin will be at the London Coliseum from December 5 to 9. For more information, visit londoncoliseum.org.

 

Picture: Sergei Polunin. Photograph: Albert Watson

Zoë was born in Edinburgh, and saw her first dance performances at the Festival there. She is the dance critic of The Independent, and has also written for The Independent on Sunday, The Scotsman and Dancing Times. In 2002, she received her doctorate from the University of York for a thesis on “Nationhood and epic romance: Ariosto, Sidney, Spenser”. She is the author of The Royal Ballet: 75 Years and The Ballet Lover’s Companion.

Connect with Dancing Times: