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Brazilian dance on London’s South Bank this summer

Posted on June 15, 2015

baila-brazil-logo-with-textThe passion of Brazil comes to London’s South Bank this summer in the form of Baila Brazil, a thrilling mix of original music, street dance and Afro-Brazilian culture.

The new show by dance company Balé de Rua premiered at Sydney Opera House in January 2015. Inspired by North-American street dance, capoeira and samba, the company’s energetic yet elegant style is born from the everyday lives of many of the company who grew up in the favelas of Uberlândia in Brazil.

Comprising 14 dancer-percussionists, one singer and a live band of keyboard, bass and guitar, Baila Brazil explores the rich cultural heritage of the Brazilian people, with choreography, costume, set design and artistic direction by Marco Antônio Garcia, lighting design by Nicolas Simonin and Yoann Pelletier and musical direction by Pedro Ferreira.

Balé de Rua was originally developed as an art project in the poor neighbourhoods of Uberlândia. Since being discovered at the Biennale de la Danse of Lyon in 2002, the company has performed at leading venues across the world, bringing their exuberance and energy to more than 500,000 people in 13 different countries. They have developed free schools in their hometown and every year train more than 300 children from local communities, including all of the dancers in the professional company.

Baila Brazil‘s original music and passionate dance forms part of the Southbank Centre’s summer-long Festival of Love. The popular riverside urban beach returns, along with many more summer events across the site including installations, performances, music, film, dance, free events and themed weekends. Baila Brazil takes place from August 5 to 15 in Royal Festival Hall. 

 

Nicola Rayner was editor of Dance Today from 2010 to 2015. She has written for a number of publications including The Guardian, The Independent and Time Out Buenos Aires, where she cut her teeth as a dance journalist working on the tango section. Now acting editor of Discover Britain magazine, she continues to dance everything from ballroom to breakdance, with varying degrees of success.

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