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A Night’s Game

Posted on January 20, 2022

Alleye Dance A Nights Game. Photo Lidia Crisafulli 3

Created in response to the UK’s societal climate, performance festival Shipbuilding from Certain Blacks runs from February 18 to 27 at Rich Mix, Bethnal Green. Named after Elvis Costello’s symbolic anti-war song and reflecting upon the climate of COVID-19, Brexit and Black Lives Matter, each show has been created from true stories. Shipbuilding also seeks to explore what it is to be British and diverse in these challenging times.

A Night’s Game by Alleyne Dance launches the festival on February 18 at 8pm. Identical twins Kristina and Sadé Alleyne present a striking duet inspired by stories of imprisonment and confinement exploring the questions: how does it feel to have your freedom taken from you? Would you spend every waking hour longing to be free again? Or would you fight against it? As well as stories of imprisonment, Alleyne Dance explore themes of escape and fighting for freedom. A Night’s Game reflects upon the turmoil and strife when faced with the prospect of incarceration.

Kristina and Sadé Alleyne, former athletes and dance artists, draw from styles of West African and Caribbean origin, plus elements of Kathak and hip hop. The say of their work: “Dancing as twins, we always have someone to bounce off. We are each other’s teachers and support systems. When we work separately, we always bring the experiences back to add to our collective development. It is sometimes about compromise, allowing one or the other to shine in certain moments. But we trust each other completely, in life and in dance.” For a closer look, or to book tickets, click here.

Pictured: Alleyne Dance in A Night’s Game. Photograph: Lidia Crisafulli. 

Nicola Rayner was editor of Dance Today from 2010 to 2015. She has written for a number of publications including The Guardian, The Independent and Time Out Buenos Aires, where she cut her teeth as a dance journalist working on the tango section. Today she continues to dance everything from ballroom to breakdance, with varying degrees of success. Her debut novel, The Girl Before You, was published last year in paperback, ebook and audiobook.

Nicola Rayner was editor of Dance Today from 2010 to 2015. She has written for a number of publications including The Guardian, The Independent and Time Out Buenos Aires, where she cut her teeth as a dance journalist working on the tango section. Today she continues to dance everything from ballroom to breakdance, with varying degrees of success. Her debut novel, The Girl Before You, was published last year in paperback, ebook and audiobook.

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