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may2016-cover

Inside this month:

Nicola Rayner meets Andrea Ghigiarelli and Sara Andracchio

Sanjoy Roy takes a look at horror in dance

Margaret Willis meets English National Ballet's Cesar Corrales, our Dancer of the Month

Jonathan Gray talks to Christopher Marney about his appointment as artistic director of Ballet Central

And much more

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Dancing Times - Features

Posited as “Slick, unpredictable and sexy”, Probe uses three contrasting couples to explore different facets of human relationships. Dancers Antonia Grove and Theo Clinkard stretch the limits of energy and stamina to complete three pieces, spanning an hour long performance.

Tango Por Dos in La Historia:

Written by Mary Clarke

Miguel Angel Zotto brought his Tango Por Dos, from Argentina, back to the Peacock Theatre May 24-June 11. The present popularity of social dance styles, and fond memories of these superb dancers, ensured full houses and much enthusiasm but I found the evening less enthralling than in the past.

The conjunction of Henri Oguike Dance Company and Britten Sinfonia, performing at the Queen Elizabeth Hall on May 7 to a large and rapturous audience, was evidence of Oguike’s keen commitment to setting modern dance to live music. In each of the works shown, whether the scores were Shostakovich, Tippett or a commission by Steve Martland, Oguike’s close reaction to musical dynamics was abundantly demonstrated.

The linking title of Voices provides the theme for Bonachela’s first programme, a double bill, for his newly-formed company. He’s always liked choreographing to vocal music, whether to pop songs or, most recently in Curious Conscience for Rambert, poems set to music by Benjamin Britten. Mark Baldwin had challenged him to extend his range with the Britten score; now Bonachela is pushing himself further, taking on Luciano Berio’s Naturale for the opening piece, Ahotsak, and commissioning a score from Matthew Herbert for Set Boundaries.

John Neumeier is no stranger to the Paris Opéra Ballet, the company having already performed his versions of The Nutcracker, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Sylvia, besides the Magnificat he made for them. Now it has acquired his La Dame aux camélias, which he had originally made in 1978 for Marcia Haydée and the Stuttgart Ballet; it is currently in the repertory of the Hamburg Ballet, which he has directed for over 30 years.

Following the success of the Ballet Nacional de Cuba’s visit to Sadler’s Wells last year, the company made a swift return visit to London in early September with a repertoire consisting of the full length Don Quixote and a mixed programme of ballet “lollipops” called Magia de la Danza. Part of the success of the Cubans’ previous visit, for me at least, was the revelation of a troupe of dancers with a uniformity of schooling and style – a style that harks back to the era of the former Ballets Russes companies with whom Alicia Alonso, the founder of the Nacional Ballet, was a celebrated ballerina. The company also employs a variety of very talented principals and soloists, who could justifiably grace the stages of any number of ballet theatres across the globe. One cannot help but appreciate the high standards of dancing that Alicia Alonso has been able to develop – she is the Cuban equivalent of Britain’s Ninette de Valois and Marie Rambert. What cannot be disguised, however, is the utter poverty of the company’s production values: threadbare backcloths and rudimentary scenery; costumes and wigs that look as if they had been made 50 years ago for a school production – they do little to enhance the quality of the dancing or the veracity of the acting. Regular Dancing Times readers will be aware of the poor state of the rehearsal studios for the company and school in Havana, and there was an extraordinary response to our request for donations of new dance shoes and practice clothes for the company last summer. One can only hope that with more regular visits to Western Europe, the Nacional Ballet’s bank balance will become healthier.

Wherever the Ascendance Rep dancers perform there is always an expectant atmosphere, indeed a collective hum of anticipation. The company delights and cheers. Its mission is to reach out and this it does, thoughtfully and entertainingly. The company has created its own audiences through performances in art galleries, museums, libraries, bookshops and even on railway station platforms. Curious people stopped, enquired as to what was happening and then they stayed around for the remainder of the performance. As a consequence the company’s theatre dates are attracting people new to theatre and new to contemporary dance in theatres. Their touring programmes are attractive to newcomers to dance and at the same time there is are intellectual and emotional depths to challenge the more experienced.

Dutch National Ballet in Jewels:

Written by Marc Haegeman
During the last ten years George Balanchine’s Jewels has gradually become one of the standards of the classical repertory to which any self-respecting troupe should aspire. More and more companies around the world acquire Balanchine’s 1967 plotless triptych and enchant new audiences with its evocation of precious stones subtly linked to the three dance cultures closest to the choreographer – French romanticism, American neoclassicism and the Imperial Russian Ballet.
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